Multiple Injuries Lead to Recall of Super Jumper Trampolines

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More than 20,000 Super Jumper trampolines have been recalled, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. The trampolines pose “fall and injury hazards” because of leg welds that can snap while jumping.

Serious Safety Risk

Super Jumper, a San Francisco-based company, received nearly 100 reports of breakage when the welds on the metal railings snapped. This causes the legs to collapse, posing a major safety hazard. 4 customers reportedly suffered minor injuries.

Considering that these trampolines are most often used by kids, it’s not worth taking any chances about safety.

“Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled trampolines and contact Super Jumper for a free repair kit which consists of reinforcement clamps that clamp around the trampolines’ welded joints,” the official recall notice warned.

Recall Details

The trampolines, which cost anywhere from $200-$400, were sold exclusively online. Amazon.com, Hayneedle.com, Overstock.com, and Wayfair.com all sold the recalled trampolines from 2011 through June 2019.

Super Jumper 14-foot trampolines, as well as the 14-foot and 16-foot combo trampolines that include a netted enclosure without reinforcement clamps, are all vulnerable to this type of breakage. 23,000 of the trampolines were sold in the United States, as well as nearly 1000 in Canada.

Customers are encouraged to request repair kits from the manufacturer as soon as possible. Call Super Jumper at 866-757-3636 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST, Monday through Friday, email recall@superjumperinc.com, or go to www.superjumperinc.com.

Are Any Home Trampolines Safe?

According to the Mayo Clinic, all trampolines pose a safety risk to children. The American Academy of Pediatrics advises against buying any brand of home trampoline due to the high incidence of sprains and breaks. Children can also suffer head and neck injuries if they land badly.

You should never allow kids to play on a trampoline unsupervised. Only one person at a time should use the trampoline to avoid accidental collisions. Even though it might seem like a fun challenge, don’t allow kids to do somersaults or other stunts.

If you do decide to install a home trampoline–or repair your Super Jumper after the recall–make sure that it is on flat ground with no nearby trees, fences, or other hazards. Never use a trampoline that is wet, rusted, or damaged in any way.